Measuring Coverage for Seniors in Medicare Part A and Estimating the Cost of Making It Universal

Author/Editor: Michael Birnbaum and Elizabeth M. Patchias

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In 2005, 1.6 million seniors—or 5 percent of the elderly U.S. population—were without a full federal Medicare Part A premium subsidy, and the share of seniors without this benefit was notably higher in the nation’s two largest states—California (12 percent) and New York (8 percent). Reforming Medicare Part A to make the benefit truly universal—as many already assume it is—and fully federal would cost the federal government an estimated $6 billion in new spending in federal fiscal year 2011, an increase in baseline federal Medicare expenditures of 1.1 percent.

This article was published by the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (Vol. 35, No. 1, February 2010). It is available here with the journal's permission.

Copyright: 2010
Published: 02.22.2010

 

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